Blog Tour: Resurrection Girls by Ava Morgyn

I was death’s sister.
She was murderer’s daughter.

Olivia Foster hasn’t felt alive since her little brother drowned in the backyard pool three years ago. Then Kara Hallas moves in across the street with her mother and grandmother, and Olivia is immediately drawn to these three generations of women. Kara is particularly intoxicating, so much so that Olivia not only comes to accept Kara’s morbid habit of writing to men on death row, she helps her do it. They sign their letters as the Resurrection Girls.

But as Kara’s friendship pulls Olivia out of the dark fog she’s been living in, Olivia realizes that a different kind of darkness taints the otherwise lively Hallas women—an impulse that is strange, magical, and possibly deadly.
 
 
Thank you YA Bound Book Tours for providing me with an advanced reader copy in exchange for an honest review. Resurrection Girls was published on October 1, 2019 and available on Amazon, Book Depository, and other book retailers.

what is it about?

Resurrection Girls started three years after Olivia Foster’s little brother, Robby, drowned in the pool in their backyard. Broken and crushed, her mother was consuming pills to escape the grief and her father wasn’t around that much, arriving home during late hours and avoiding conversation or any sort of social interaction with the remains of his family. When three generations of women moving into a house across the street, Olivia didn’t realize that her lonesome journey will take turns. The Hallas women are intoxicating and mysterious, and soon Olivia made friends with Kara, who’s full of confidence, odd, and seems to know a lot about Olivia ever since their very first encounter.

what do I think about it?

The first thing that strikes my mind about this book is that it was far from what I was expected. Looking at the cover, reading the synopsis, checking the genres’ list, I was expecting this book will be heavier on the fantasy, magical, and witchy elements. But in reality, this is a story of grieving, losing your loved ones, dealing with unavoidable emptiness, and healing. Although I’m not complaning, because Morgyn did an awesome job for delivering this story with her haunting and poetic narratives.
 
I had a great time with this book, especially diving in its odd plot and exploring its quirky characters. The originality of Resurrection Girls was outstanding and it was bizarre when I first read about Olivia and Kara’s correspondences with the prisoned criminals, but it was so bizarre that it actually attracted me to keep reading. Their friendship also dynamic and always interesting to be followed, as I keep wondering what’s the next thing that they were gonna do after I finished each chapter.
 
Unfortunately, there were other things that prevent me from having that extraordinary, one of a kind reading experience. The inconsistentency of the plot was my first issue, and I’ve been thinking about it since the earlier chapters, especially because things are slow during those earlier chapters and I didn’t feel that many of those scenes contributed big impact on the bigger picture of the story, yet it took a fast route every since Olivia met Kara. I also couldn’t fully engaged and resonated with the rest of Olivia’s family. And I had so many questions that bugging me throughout the story, especially towards the Hallas. What’s their history? How exactly are their “magic” works? Are they naturally born with their charms to manipulate people or is it a work of magic? Why there were no men in their family tree? Where was Kara’s father? Why was Kara grow an interest to penpal prisoned criminals? I wish there’d be more explanation about all of these since the Hallas was the reason why this story happening in the first place.
 
Overall, Resurrection Girls is a poignant debut that explores loss, grieving, and healing with such graceful way. The little incorporation of magical realism in this contemporary might be a hit or a miss, which all depends on your reading preference.

what’s the verdict?

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What’s your latest favorite hard-hitting book? Are you thinking about adding Resurrection Girls to your next reading list?

A Different Time by Michael K. Hill

Today is the last day of the #UltimateBlogTour for A Different Time by Michael K. Hill and I’m excited to bring you my review of this book! Also, thank you Dave @ TheWriteReads for hosting this exciting tour and give me the opportunity to join the fun! 
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Keith Nolan falls in love with a remarkable young woman from the past, talking to him on a home video she recorded in 1989. To keep their conversation going, he must find more of her tapes—while forces work against them both, and time is running out.
Thank you Michael and Dave for providing me with an advanced reader copy in exchange for an honest review. A Different Time published on July 2, 2019 and  available on AmazonBook Depository, and other book retailers.

the blurb

A Different Time follows the story of 22 years old Keith Nolan, a comic enthusiast who’d rather spend his weekend digging through the flea markets to complete the comic collection that he inherited from his father. It was supposed to be just another normal weekend, until he accidentally found a home videotape, where he can communicate through the screen with a young woman who recorded it thirty years ago, Lindsey. Thrilled with his discovery and a company that he longed for, Keith must find the rest of the tapes to keep their conversation going.

the review

Concept-wise, I applaud Michael for his unique and original idea. Never in a million years, I’d imagine where someone could communicate through a used videotape, not to mention that they were thirty years apart. Although the alternate timelines concept kind of reminds me of Kimi No Nawa (Your Name), but Michael successfully delivered his own twist in this book. I’m also squealing with all of the comic references in this book and how it was explained as a timeless art piece, whether you lived in 1989 or 2019.
 
Although I’m loving the characters in this story, Keith and Lindsey, unfortunately, I couldn’t engage with their chemistry and romance. It was cute, but it was too instalove-y for my liking and the number of obstacles that Keith would conquer in order to meet the love of his life, was unbelievable to me. Yes, having a crush during your first encounter with someone is totally common, but being ready to give up your everything to fight for them? Seem a bit like a stretch to me.
 
In conclusion, I’m loving the pitch of this book but I can totally see its huge potential if the pages were longer and the characters were dug deeper. 

the verdict

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Are you thinking about adding A Different Time to your next reading list?